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The Pursuit of Individual Rights is Overshadowing Our National Rights

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Guest writer Mairtin Mac Giolla Eoin, a former Republican Prisoner and current Republican activist from Derry gives us his thoughts on individual rights vs national rights


I’ve been discussing this topic over the past month or so with some comrades, I feel that it would be useful to articulate my thoughts and the process that has lead me to the conclusion that our national rights are being overshadowed.


First of all what do I mean by our national rights? Our sovereignty as a people and a nation is the foremost right; it is undeniable that we are a distinct people, with both a vibrant culture and language. Our identity has been suppressed for as long as we have been occupied and it can never be fully realised under British rule or via her surrogates in Leinster house. Secondly our right to an Irish Republic, despite some narratives a United Ireland is not the objective, as our country can be united under many guises, such as it had been in the past entirely under British Rule. There are…

Duleek memorial garden 10th Anniversary Oration

Oration delivered in Duleek, Co. Meath on the 10th anniversary of the opening of their hunger strike memorial garden

Today, we remember in this memorial garden the 22 Irish republicans who gave their lives whilst on hunger strike. The first Irish patriot to sacrifice his life was Thomas Ashe with the last being Mickey Devine. When considering the lives of each one of the hunger strikers, aside from their heroic sacrifice, it is striking the commonalities they share. Each one of these men came to the decision to hunger strike after careful thought and consideration, each one fully realised the suffering their families would endure, yet each one selflessly recognised the need to make a stand for their cause with the last weapon they had at their disposal: Their body.

Some anti-republican commentators and historical revisionists, are often quick to dismiss the act of hunger strike, advising that these noble patriots were desperate and misguided. At every turn, we must reject such comment…

100 Years of Votes for Women

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Article orginally written and published in An Larc quarterly magazine to coincide with 100 Years of Votes for Women

It is now 100 years ago since Britain passed a law allowing women to vote for the first time, well for some women this was true, namely, only those who were over 30 and had property rights or a university education. That accounted for around 40% of all women in the “UK”.

Ireland, in 1918, was united, albeit under British Rule, Partition was still a few years away and this affected everyone in the whole 32 Counties, the whole country including men.

While women with certain criteria were allowed the vote, the act also changed the laws surrounding male votes, up until 1918 only men who were paying an annual rental of £10 and all those holding land valued at £10 or more were allowed to vote, this new legislation allowed for ALL men regardless of class, property ownership or education to vote as long as they were over 21 and for those in the British Military they could even vote…

Michael Fagan (Invincible) commemoration oration

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Oration delivered in Collinstown, Co. Westmeath on Sunday 27th May 2018 for the 135th Anniversary of the death of Michael Fagan, Irish National Invincible. Organised by Michael Fagan Society & Spirit of Irish Freedom Society.


Today, we gather to pay tribute to the memory of Michael Fagan, a great republican and member of the Irish National Invincibles who gave his life for the cause of Irish freedom 135 years ago. It is appropriate that the people of Collinstown keep the memory of their patriotic native son alive, not only for his heroic example in life, but also to remember the important contribution to Irish republicanism of the group he was a member of: The Invincibles. Fagan and four members of the Invincibles took part in the assassinations of the Chief Secretary of Ireland, Frederick Cavendish, and the Under-Secretary, Thomas Henry Burke, two officials of the British administration in Ireland. These assassinations took place in the Phoenix Park, on May 6th, 1882.

The Invincib…

Tony Taylor's continued internment is an affront to Justice

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I originally wrote this piece in 2016, at that time Tony Taylor was interned for only 7 months, it is scandalous that two years later the contents of this article has not much changed, I have updated this article to reflect today’s situation.


Tony Taylor, a Derry Republican has now been interned for over two years.

Tony is a normal family man with a wife, children and responsibilities just like everyone else, he has been interned at the behest of the British Secretary of State in Ireland and has no charge against him, he has no case to answer and he has no trial to face. So why exactly is Tony Taylor in Jail? Why was he taken from his home and placed indefinitely in a prison cell? He certainly doesn’t know why nor does his family or lawyers; his predicament can be summed up with only one word - Internment!






This is a word that in 2018 people are hesitant to use, it has an emotive history in Ireland, where hundreds of people in the 70’s had been wholesale subjected to internment. There …

Republicans must stand united in defiance of British rule and all its vestiges

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Republicans must stand united in defiance of British rule and all its vestiges The disgusting scenes from the British Armed Police in Lurgan today are enough to shock anyone; it is a throw back to what middle of the road mediocre pundits would call “the dark old days”. But to look at what happened in Lurgan today we must understand why it happened.

In Ireland Republicans and anyone who assembles on the street must seek permission from the British State, many Republicans in recent years have done this in order to avoid any kind of annoyance, for peace sake you may say. For many Republicans seeking permission from the British state stands in direct contradiction of being a republican, I am one such Republican. I stand by the Proclamation of 1916, I do not take it as a mild suggestion, to me it is the cornerstone of my faith and I abide by it as faithfully as I can. The Proclamation is not vague when it comes to this issue:

“We declare the right of the people of Ireland to the ownership …

Hooded men ruling gives permission to torture

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Taking someone to a secret location against their will, putting them up against a wall in a stress position, beating them, hooding them, playing white noise constantly, denying them food, water and sleep doesn’t constitute torture according to the European court of human rights!

I awoke this morning to find the news that the hooded men case had upheld the original 1978 ruling, to say I am aggrieved for all the men involved in an understatement, but am I surprised? Not really if I am honest, it is nothing to do with the reality of the case, anyone with even a scant interest in human rights will concede that the five techniques used against these men most certainly counts as torture. I am not surprised because when it comes to human rights abuses there are certain countries that are deemed above that, players if you will and the UK is one of them.

In 1971 Ireland was in the midst of mass Internment by the British government, for 14 men this meant the beginning of a period of torture, tort…